USC Students for Justice in Palestine

history, analysis, news, and event updates on the struggle for justice in palestine

The Economist: “Please, not again”

Posted by uscsjp on January 9, 2011

First, from Democracy Now!:

“WikiLeaks: Israeli Corruption at Gaza Crossing Exposed

In the latest news from WikiLeaks, a newly disclosed classified U.S. diplomatic cable from 2006 reveals that Coca-Cola and other U.S. companies have complained that a key Israeli cargo crossing for goods entering the Gaza Strip was rife with corruption. The memo indicates that Israeli officials asked a Coca-Cola distributor to pay more than $3,000 to get a truckload of merchandise through the Karni Crossing. Other companies that had complained about the corruption include Procter & Gamble, Caterpillar, Philip Morris, Westinghouse, Hewlett-Packard, Motorola and Dell.

Israeli Troops Kill 65-Year-Old Man in Home Raid

In the occupied West Bank, Israeli troops killed a 65-year-old Palestinian civilian named Amr Qawasme in a pre-dawn house raid earlier today in Hebron. Amr Qawasme’s wife, Sopheye, said the troops stormed into his bedroom while he was sleeping.

Sopheye Qawasme: ‘He wasn’t even awake. They just entered the door and shot him right away. I had gone to pray. When I came back, they told me. I have no idea how they just broke into the house and shot him. They came at me and put a rifle to my head, and they shot him again.’

The Israeli military confirmed that Amr Qawasme was a civilian, but said the raid was justified because a member of Hamas was living in the building.

Ex-Mossad Chief: Iran Nuclear Program Set Back Many Years

In Israel, the outgoing head of Mossad said Thursday that he does not believe Iran will have nuclear weapons capability before 2015. Meir Dagan said Iran was a long way from being able to produce nuclear weapons, following a series of failures that had set its program back by several years…”

–Democracy Now!, 7 January, 2011

http://www.democracynow.org/2011/1/7/headlines#8

See Also this conservative-leaning but informative piece from The Economist:

The United States, Israel and the Arabs

Please Not Again!

“NO WAR, no peace, is the usual state of affairs between Israel and its neighbours in the Middle East. But every time an attempt at Arab-Israeli peacemaking fails, as Barack Obama’s did shortly before Christmas, the peace becomes a little more fragile and the danger of war increases. Sadly, there is reason to believe that unless remedial action is taken, 2011 might see the most destructive such war for many years.
One much-discussed way in which war might arise stems from the apparent desire of Iran to acquire nuclear weapons at any cost, and Israel’s apparent desire to stop Iran at any cost. But fear of Iran’s nuclear programme is only one of the fuses that could detonate an explosion at any moment. Another is the frantic arms race that has been under way since the inconclusive war in 2006 between Israel and Hizbullah, Iran’s ally in Lebanon. Both sides have been intensively preparing for what each says will be a ‘decisive’ second round.

Such a war would bear little resemblance to the previous clashes between Israel and its neighbours. For all their many horrors, the Lebanon war of 2006 and the Gaza war of 2009 were limited affairs. On the Israeli side, in particular, civilian casualties were light. Since 2006, however, Iran and Syria have provided Hizbullah with an arsenal of perhaps 50,000 missiles and rockets, many with ranges and payloads well beyond what Hizbullah had last time. This marks an extraordinary change in the balance of power. For the first time a radical non-state actor has the power to kill thousands of civilians in Israel’s cities more or less at the press of a button.

In that event, says Israel, it will strike back with double force. A war of this sort could easily draw in Syria, and perhaps Iran. For the moment, deterrence keeps the peace. But a peace maintained by deterrence alone is a frail thing. The shipment to Hizbullah of a balance-tipping new weapon, a skirmish on the Lebanese or increasingly volatile Gaza border—any number of miscalculations could ignite a conflagration…”

–The Economist, 29 December, 2010

http://www.economist.com/node/17800151

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